About

Hansje Brinker and Seattle Children’s Hospital

The Hansje Brinker Guild was founded by a group of women with a Dutch background living in the Seattle area. The Hansje Brinker Guild supports the Child Life department of Seattle Children’s hospital, which “helps ease the fears that children and families face while undergoing treatment for life-threatening diseases or emergencies”. Child Life provides a supervised playroom and bedside activities for all patients. The Hansje Brinker Guild is an excellent way for the Dutch and others to contribute to the greater Seattle community.

Seattle Children’s Hospital

Seattle Children’s Hospital is a premier health care and pediatric center, recognized as one of the leading US hospitals for children. For more than 100 years, Seattle Children’s Hospital has specialized in meeting the unique physical, emotional and developmental needs of children from infancy through young adulthood.

Through the collaboration of physicians in nearly 60 pediatric subspecialties, they provide inpatient, outpatient, diagnostic, surgical, rehabilitative, behavioral, emergency and outreach services – regardless of a family’s ability to pay.

Child Life Department

The Child Life Department helps make a family’s experience at the hospital a positive one. Child Life specialists are members of the child’s healthcare team. They work directly with the families and their child to help relieve tension, express concerns and fears, and feel more in control about their hospital experience.

Services offered by the Child Life Department include an inpatient playroom, teen zone, sibling playroom, animal assisted activities, and music and art as a form of therapy.

Click here to learn more about Seattle Children’s Child Life.

Uncompensated Care Program

In 2011, Children’s picked up the tab for $103.4 million in care that was not otherwise paid for. Approximately $10.7 million of that total covered unpaid medical services – costs that families incurred for care beyond their ability to pay.

The rest of the total – a whopping $92.7 million – covered payment shortfalls from Medicaid, the government program that provides medical coverage at no cost to low income families. Nearly half of patients are covered by Medicaid, but the program reimbursed us for only 71% of the real cost of treatment.

By filling in the gaps left by Medicaid shortfalls or a family’s inability to pay, Children’s helps parents focus on what’s most important – the health and wellbeing of their child.

Approximately 12% of the $103.4 million in uncompensated care provided by Children’s in 2011 came from philanthropic contributions.